Venezuela: The Future Of Free Water And Cheap Electricity

Over at Americanthinker.com, Jeannie DeAngelis describes the scene in Venezuela, where everything has been made a human Right, and therefore nothing is available. It seems that Socialists will never learn Basic Economics, and will continue to ravage countries which are unfortunate enough to fall in their hands. And population, made sufficiently economic  illiterate by the Left control of education, will continue to fall for the fairy called Socialism.

 

“The late Hugo Chávez, proponent of socialized everything, once said something similar to what Obama’s actions tacitly lend credibility to, which is that “healthcare is a human right.” Chávez said:

Privatization is a neoliberal and imperialist plan. Health can’t be privatized because it is a fundamental human right, nor can education, water, electricity and other public services. They can’t be surrendered to private capital that denies the people from their rights.

And so, the Venezuelan government controls water and electricity. Despite all that government oversight, regrettably, the people of Venezuela often find themselves in the dark because according to César Batiz in an article in the Americas Quarterly, since the nation nationalized the electrical grid, the “government has failed to build enough new power plants and to maintain existing ones.”

Although America is approximately 1,500 miles away from Venezuela, that sounds similar to how the hospital and doctor shortage is shaping up since ObamaCare became law.

As for public health services, Venezuela has high instances of Dengue fever, especially in areas that lack the potable water and trash collection. Although Chávez said that water is a human right and that the water supply is best overseen by the régime, there are water shortages and rationing.

And just as all these other human rights have turned out in Venezuela, so too is the non-privatized fundamental human right of government-provided healthcare ending up to be a forecast of what America can expect when Obama’s fundamental transformation of the U.S. healthcare system is complete.

Currently, Venezuela is suffering from a drug shortage so dire that the shelves in the pharmacies and the hospitals are completely bare.
So perhaps Americans, who get antsy if they have to wait more than 10 minutes for Amoxicillin for a kid’s earache, should consider an ObamaCare scared-straight fieldtrip to a Caracas pharmacy, where there is no Vitamin C, no folic acid, and no acetaminophen. Meanwhile, thanks to superior government-provided public health services, 35,000 Venezuelans infected with mosquito-transmitted viruses like Chikungunya have no Tylenol to treat severe joint pain.

So much for government-enforced human rights.

According to an article by Sergio Held titled “Tweeting for Treatment in Venezuela”, the country is also “facing a critical shortage of basic medical supplies.” Adding insult to injury, pharmacists must keep their stores open eight hours a day even though the shelves are bare, because if they close the benevolent human rights-oriented Venezuelan government suspends their license.

Not only are very sick people being denied essential medicines to survive, the Venezuelan healthcare infrastructure is collapsing because of money the government owes drug companies and other healthcare providers. While Hugo the Late considered privatization of healthcare to be denying basic human rights, 15% of Venezuela’s cancer patients are dying for lack of radiotherapy treatment and breast cancer victims are waiting to have tumors removed at a large Venezuelan medical facility, which on a smaller scale can certainly be likened to America’s VA waiting list where U.S. veterans died from lack of treatment.” (from the article.)

Read the whole article here.